Author profile

David R. Richardson, MD

hide first letter

Dr David Richardson joined the BCMJ Editorial Board in 2006, and became editor of the Journal in August 2008. Dr Richardson has been a general practitioner in Langley since 1992 and is on active staff at Langley Hospital. His extracurricular activities include soccer, mountain biking, and competing as a triathlete.

Dr David Esler and Dr Robert Vroom
News / June 2018

As the saying goes, “time waits for no one,” or something like that. I wish it had waited a little longer as, not without a little sadness, the BCMJ Editorial Board is saying goodbye to Dr Robert Vroom. Dr Vroom has... Read More

Gel electrophoresis for DNA analysis
Editorials / June 2018

“Hey Doc, what are you going to do to help me? I’m at risk for obesity, gout, diabetes, gallstones, heart disease, and kidney disease.” “Bob, despite the fact that obesity is already more of a fact than a risk for... Read More

acronyms
Editorials / May 2018

I’m overdue for a good rant. Synonyms for the word rant include shout, wild, impassioned, fulminate, vociferate, diatribe, sound off, spout, pontificate, bluster, tirade, yell, and bellow. Who wouldn’t feel better after... Read More

A window covered in raindrops; the shape of a sun has been made within the water
Editorials / April 2018

By the time this editorial is published I will have survived another winter. Now, don’t get me wrong, I love living in British Columbia and particularly the Lower Mainland. I have called it home since preschool, and... Read More

Editorials / March 2018

I was an active child, or should I confess that perhaps “clumsy” would be a better description? I always seemed to be falling and would often lead with my least valuable body part—my head. I cut my chin jumping into a... Read More

News / December 2017

We would like to thank Dr Anne Clarke for her significant contribution to the BCMJ Editorial Board over the last 6 years. Dr Clarke has decided to broaden her career as an emergency physician by moving to... Read More

Editorials / October 2017

When I enter my office examination rooms, patients are often interacting with their smart phones. My demographic (let’s call them the old-timers) are usually playing solitaire or some other game. I often ask the younger... Read More

Pages