ImmunizeBC: An online resource for health professionals

Every day immunization saves lives and makes it possible for British Columbians to live free of illness and disability associated with many vaccine-preventable diseases. In 2007 the province developed ImmunizeBC, a strategic framework to stimulate collective action across the health system and ensure that all British Columbians understand the importance of immunization for themselves, their families, and vulnerable populations.


Every day immunization saves lives and makes it possible for British Columbians to live free of illness and disability associated with many vaccine-preventable diseases. In 2007 the province developed ImmunizeBC, a strategic framework to stimulate collective action across the health system and ensure that all British Columbians understand the importance of immunization for themselves, their families, and vulnerable populations. 

ImmunizeBC is a collaborative project of the Ministry of Health, BC Centre for Disease Control, regional health authorities, and HealthLinkBC. A key component of the ImmunizeBC framework is its website, which provides evidence-based information on immunization for health professionals and the public, along with tools to make it easier for BC families to get immunized. 

British Columbians rely on the province’s network of dedicated health professionals, including physicians, to deliver immunization services. To support health professionals, ImmunizeBC hosts a range of clinical resources and information on immunization, vaccine-preventable diseases, and related issues. These resources can be found at www.immunizebc.ca in the health professionals’ section. 

At ImmunizeBC, doctors can find: 

•    The current BC immunization sched-ules for infants, children, and adults, with vaccine product monographs.
•    A quick reference immunization communication tool for immunizers that provides both clinical evidence and client knowledge to address com-mon immunization questions and vaccine misconceptions.
•    The BC Centre for Disease Control manual, Chapter II: Immunization Program, which provides best practice guidelines for the provision of immunization services.
•    Resources to assist health practition-ers in recognizing adverse events following immunization and the criteria and tools for reporting such events.
•    Information on pharmacologic, phy-si-cal, and psychological evidence-based interventions to increase child comfort before and during the administration of a vaccine.

ImmunizeBC also has resources on the various publicly funded vaccine programs in BC. For example, during influenza season physicians can visit the site to find information about the vaccine, a list of groups eligible to receive the vaccine at no cost, and updates on applicable safety issues. Resources about the live attenuated influenza vaccine given by nasal spray are also available. These resources include the steps of vaccine administration, a question-and- answer-document, and a list of health screening questions.

Physicians can also access resources created by other organizat-ions, such as the Child Health Pass-port developed by the Ministry of Health and the Extra Protection Checklist on non-publicly funded vaccines created by the BC Pediatric Society. If physicians are unable to find the information they require at ImmunizeBC or have further questions, they can contact their local public health unit. Print resources, including immunization brochures and posters, may also be accessed from public health units. 

In addition to providing information for health professionals, ImmunizeBC is a resource for the public. ImmunizeBC provides evidence-based information about vaccines along with a number of tools to make it easier for BC families to get immunized. Examples of the tools available include:

•    An immunization text message reminder service.
•    An application that creates a child’s personalized immunization schedule.
•    An online postal code–based public health immunization clinic locator and flu clinic locator.
•    An online chat with a nurse application.
•    An interactive Q & A feature.
•    Physicians are encouraged to refer their patients to ImmunizeBC to access these and other resources.

Vaccines have improved the lives of all Canadians, and in the last 50 years immunization has saved more lives than any other health intervention.[1] ImmunizeBC is committed to providing high-quality, evidence-based information for health professionals and the public.
—Chelsea Haines, RN, BScN
Immunization Promotion Nurse, ImmunizeBC 
—Jessica Harper, RN, BScN 
Vaccine Educator, Immunization Programs and Vaccine Preventable Diseases Service, BCCDC

hidden


This article is the opinion of BCCDC and has not been peer reviewed by the BCMJ Editorial Board.


References

1.    National Advisory Committee on Immunization. The benefits of vaccines. In: Canadian Immunization Guide. 7th ed. Ottawa, ON: Public Health Agency of Canada; 2006. p. 17.

Chelsea Haines, RN, BScN,, Jessica Harper, RN, BScN,. ImmunizeBC: An online resource for health professionals. BCMJ, Vol. 55, No. 9, November, 2013, Page(s) 431,433 - BCCDC.



Above is the information needed to cite this article in your paper or presentation. The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) recommends the following citation style, which is the now nearly universally accepted citation style for scientific papers:
Halpern SD, Ubel PA, Caplan AL, Marion DW, Palmer AM, Schiding JK, et al. Solid-organ transplantation in HIV-infected patients. N Engl J Med. 2002;347:284-7.

About the ICMJE and citation styles

The ICMJE is small group of editors of general medical journals who first met informally in Vancouver, British Columbia, in 1978 to establish guidelines for the format of manuscripts submitted to their journals. The group became known as the Vancouver Group. Its requirements for manuscripts, including formats for bibliographic references developed by the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM), were first published in 1979. The Vancouver Group expanded and evolved into the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE), which meets annually. The ICMJE created the Recommendations for the Conduct, Reporting, Editing, and Publication of Scholarly Work in Medical Journals to help authors and editors create and distribute accurate, clear, easily accessible reports of biomedical studies.

An alternate version of ICMJE style is to additionally list the month an issue number, but since most journals use continuous pagination, the shorter form provides sufficient information to locate the reference. The NLM now lists all authors.

BCMJ standard citation style is a slight modification of the ICMJE/NLM style, as follows:

  • Only the first three authors are listed, followed by "et al."
  • There is no period after the journal name.
  • Page numbers are not abbreviated.


For more information on the ICMJE Recommendations for the Conduct, Reporting, Editing, and Publication of Scholarly Work in Medical Journals, visit www.icmje.org

BCMJ Guidelines for Authors

Leave a Reply