New GPSC incentive supports family doctors to implement panel management

Issue: BCMJ, vol. 60 , No. 9 , November 2018 , Pages 432-433 GPSC

Panel management is a process of proactively managing a defined population of patients using EMR data to identify and respond to the patients’ chronic and preventive care needs. Better patient data lead to better patient care, which is why the GPSC has developed a new incentive and supports to encourage doctors to implement panel management.

A new phased approach to panel management

In addition to enabling planned proactive care for patients, accurate and optimized patient data are foundational to the transition to the patient medical home—particularly in supporting work between groups of family doctors and multidisciplinary teams. To help doctors ensure they have the best possible patient data, the Practice Support Program (PSP) is implementing a newly developed phased approach to panel management. This approach is based on what’s been learned from a PSP pilot project and the experiences of other jurisdictions (e.g., Alberta). It guides physicians and their teams toward data-informed, proactive care.

The three phases of panel management are:

  1. Empanelment: Develop an accurate list of active patients by confirming the patient-provider relationship and most responsible provider.
  2. Panel cleanup: Develop accurate, up-to-date clinical registries for three to five chosen disease indicators.
  3. Panel optimization: Develop accurate, up-to-date clinical registries for 10 to 15 disease indicators to provide planned, proactive care.

Completing the phases will enable better care for individual patients and help GPs understand their patient population as a whole. This deeper understanding of their patient population empowers physicians to advocate for community resources, make the most of their time with patients, improve preventive and proactive care, and organize team members to best serve patients.

Compensation: The Panel Development Incentive

The Panel Development Incentive[1] (made available in September 2018) compensates eligible family physicians for committing to and completing the three phases of panel management—empanelment, panel cleanup, and panel optimization.

To be eligible for the incentive, family doctors must be using an EMR system to manage patient information and have completed the GPSC PMH Assessment in the 12 months before applying for the incentive.

Valued at $6000, the Panel Development Incentive consists of three payments:

  • Payment 1 ($2000) may be claimed after eligible family doctors commit to completing the three phases of panel management within 12 months after claiming the incentive.
  • Payment 2 ($1000) may be claimed after eligible family doctors indicate that they have completed phases one and two of panel management by submitting a copy of their GPSC Panel Management Manual and Workbook.
  • Payment 3 ($3000) may be claimed after eligible family doctors indicate that they have completed phase three of panel management by submitting a copy of their GPSC Panel Management Manual and Workbook.

Doctors may claim the Panel Development Incentive only once. Doctors who have completed some or all of the phases with PSP support are eligible to receive the incentive, less any sessional payments already claimed for this work through the PSP and provided that the incentive requirements have been met.

Other resources and supports

  • The Panel Management Manual and Workbook guides GPs and practice teams through the phases of panel management step-by-step.[1]
  • EMR-based Panel Management Tools help update patient information and develop disease registries.[1]
  • In-practice coaching provides assistance directly in practices by PSP Regional Support Teams. Contact the PSP Regional Support Teams to learn more (www.gpscbc.ca/what-we-do/professional-development/psp/rst-contacts).

For more information about panel management and supports, contact psp@doctorsofbc.ca.
—Brenda Hefford, MD
Executive Director, Community Practice, Quality and Integration Department, Doctors of BC
—Alana Godin
Director, Community Practice and Quality, Community Practice, Quality and Integration Department, Doctors of BC

hidden


This article is the opinion of the GPSC and has not been peer reviewed by the BCMJ Editorial Board.


References

1.    GPSC. What we do. Patient medical homes. Panel management. Accessed 19 September 2018. www.gpscbc.ca/what-we-do/patient-medical-homes/panel-management.

Brenda Hefford, MD, Alana Godin. New GPSC incentive supports family doctors to implement panel management. BCMJ, Vol. 60, No. 9, November, 2018, Page(s) 432-433 - GPSC.



Above is the information needed to cite this article in your paper or presentation. The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) recommends the following citation style, which is the now nearly universally accepted citation style for scientific papers:
Halpern SD, Ubel PA, Caplan AL, Marion DW, Palmer AM, Schiding JK, et al. Solid-organ transplantation in HIV-infected patients. N Engl J Med. 2002;347:284-7.

About the ICMJE and citation styles

The ICMJE is small group of editors of general medical journals who first met informally in Vancouver, British Columbia, in 1978 to establish guidelines for the format of manuscripts submitted to their journals. The group became known as the Vancouver Group. Its requirements for manuscripts, including formats for bibliographic references developed by the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM), were first published in 1979. The Vancouver Group expanded and evolved into the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE), which meets annually. The ICMJE created the Recommendations for the Conduct, Reporting, Editing, and Publication of Scholarly Work in Medical Journals to help authors and editors create and distribute accurate, clear, easily accessible reports of biomedical studies.

An alternate version of ICMJE style is to additionally list the month an issue number, but since most journals use continuous pagination, the shorter form provides sufficient information to locate the reference. The NLM now lists all authors.

BCMJ standard citation style is a slight modification of the ICMJE/NLM style, as follows:

  • Only the first three authors are listed, followed by "et al."
  • There is no period after the journal name.
  • Page numbers are not abbreviated.


For more information on the ICMJE Recommendations for the Conduct, Reporting, Editing, and Publication of Scholarly Work in Medical Journals, visit www.icmje.org

BCMJ Guidelines for Authors

Leave a Reply